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ORIGINAL PAPER
A multidimensional comparative analysis of the labor market in the United States in terms of economic security and its impact on providing logistical support for the US Armed Forces stationed in Poland
Bartosz Kozicki 1, D  
,   Szymon Mitkow 1, D  
 
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Wydział Bezpieczeństwa, Logistyki i Zarządzania, Wojskowa Akademia Techniczna, Polska
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Bartosz Kozicki   

Wydział Bezpieczeństwa, Logistyki i Zarządzania, Wojskowa Akademia Techniczna, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908, Warszawa, Polska
Submission date: 2021-04-27
Final revision date: 2021-06-30
Acceptance date: 2021-07-20
Publication date: 2021-07-20
 
SLW 2021;54(1):167–181
 
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ABSTRACT
The study uses a multidimensional comparative analysis of the employed and unemployed in respective US states in four groups of dependent variables in the form of months: January 2020, November 2020, December 2020, January 2021 and its impact on providing logistical support to the US Armed Forces stationed in Poland . The research period of the study covers the impact of the crisis caused by the COVID-19 infectious disease pandemic. It led to a sharp increase in unemployment in April 2020. Such a strong and rapid growth dynamics of unemployment rates in the United States has not yet been recorded in history. An analysis conducted by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates serious damage to the US labor market as a result of the COVID-19 infectious disease. At the end of November 2020 there were 9.8 million fewer people employed than in February (excluding agricultural work which is of a seasonal nature) [https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/12/covid19-pandemic-usa- employment-inequality /, status on 03/27/2021]. In 2020, the US national unemployment rate was at 3.6% in January and reached a record 14.7% in April. It has dropped dramatically since then, to around 6.7% in November, but the recovery has been uneven for women and black people, Latinos and young people - still experiencing high levels of unemployment. Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of long-term unemployed has been growing steadily [https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/dec/31/us-unemployment-december-coronavirus as of 03/27/2021]. An analysis of government data from the Pew Research Center shows that job losses during the pandemic hit workers in low-wage jobs particularly hard [https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/02/10/unemployed -americans-are-feeling-the-emotional-strain-of-job-loss-most-have-considered-changing-occupations /, as of 27/03/2021]. From December 2019 to December 2020, the percentage decline in employment in low-wage occupations was more than twice as high as in occupations with average wages (-12.5% vs. -5.3%) while employment in high-wage occupations slightly increased in this period [https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/02/10/unemployed-americans-are-feeling-the-emotional-strain-of-job-loss-most-have-considered-changing- occupations /, as of 27/03/2021]. An estimated 20 million people have lost their jobs in the United States. The data was downloaded from the website: https://www.bls.gov/ to conduct the research. They were grouped, inferred and ranked. The last stage of the research was the calculation of unemployment rates in four groups of dependent variables and outlining a bar chart by applying the ranking with the use of the median in four groups of observed variables.
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ISSN:1508-5430